Lost in space – one step forward, four steps back for Pakistan

If the test series between Australia and Pakistan was a smiling contest, the tourists would have won it in a canter.

But smile as they did, only the herculean efforts of a few individuals across the course of a nightmare series left them bearing their pearly whites on the final day of the Sydney test.

There was more to grimace about than anything else when Josh Hazlewood took the final wicket to dismiss Pakistan in the very same disappointing fashion as the second innings in Melbourne and Hamilton.

The three game changing collapses they suffered across the tour cost them in the long run and will have left them with their heads spinning like a carousel. One of the leading side-effects to touring Australia.

david-warner-deccan-chronicle
Australian opener David Warner celebrating a hundred during the first innings of the Sydney test. Picture – Deccan Chronicle.

The momentum they carried over from a successful tour of England – in one of their toughest road trips since they set up home base in the UAE – came to a grinding halt in New Zealand where their batting failed to cope with the unpredictability of the local wickets.

But the fire that was lit against the poms by their ageing warriors has been extinguished by father time and the Australian doldrums which have tripped up many an ageing batsman in the past.

Misbah’s fearless leadership during the most turbid and uncertain of times for Pakistan cricket makes him a gladiator of the modern game and one of the finest to ever pull on the green and yellow threads.

He drowned out the ever present distractions – spot-fixing scandals and the ineptitude of a corrupt board – through an iron will to show the world that Pakistan are far from the fallen giants they are often made out to be. All the while, staying true to himself and his roots.

Both with bat and in front of the press he exuded a calmness that would have made the most nervous debutante stand to attention.

But the man who is responsible for returning Pakistan to number one in the world would be lucky to get picked out at a set of traffic lights in Lahore by a passing motorist, such is the state of cricket in Pakistan and the fact that home is no longer where the heart is.

And he must now make a call on whether the time is right for him to pass the baton onto the next in line or maintain the legacy that has seen Pakistan make an unprecedented resurgence.

A whitewash never reflects well on the captain, no matter how much success he’s had in the past or whether he still has the backing of the dressing room.

Ricky Ponting’s leadership was rarely questioned, but when the bullets began flying from all angles he eventually surrendered and recognised that the captaincy had passed him by.

This series loss would be as difficult to stomach as any for Misbah, just as that 2010/11 Ashes series was for Ponting. Not because of the fashion in which it was lost, but for the heavy lifting that now must be had to prevent the Pakistan test side from sliding back down the world rankings.

And the lifting process is almost certain to leave a few with aching backs and put the odd nose out of joint.

There were flashpoints – the near historic win at the Gabba and Azhar Ali’s unbeaten double century on the biggest stage of all. But for all the positives Pakistan can take with them there are three negatives to cancel them out.

Yasir Shah, Pakistan’s key weapon, was used as poorly as an old dishrag and the fields that were set never allowed for him to prosper, let alone create pressure to bore the Australian batsmen out.

He’s the finest leg-spin bowler in the world but a tradesman is only as good as his tools.

Pakistan’s fast bowlers are some of the most highly qualified in the game but tacticians they are not.

Peter Handscomb had a field day against the all left-arm seam attack at the Gabba, and followed it up in Melbourne and Sydney to finish with a Bradman-esque average.

yasir-shah-always-smiling
The smiling assassin Yasir Shah. Or is that Lionel Messi?

Mohammad Amir may have taken out the award for most dramatic fielding effort when his knee plugged in the Gabba outfield, but the collective sighs of astonishment from Pakistan’s fielders as Handscomb carved yet another back foot punch behind point for four comes in at a close second.

Take one look at Handscomb’s wagon wheel’s and you can see that the region from backward point to third man was favoured heavily.

But Pakistan’s bowlers never adjusted, never came around the wicket to change the angle or plug up gaps to begin executing a plan B. Or maybe they did but it was too little too late by the time they came to their senses.

Any bowling side that allows an opposition player to chalk up a chance-less hundred inside a session must have their tactical nous questioned. Even if Warner’s brilliance on the day was enough to dismantle any attack the world over.

They were as helpless and similarly nonreactive in the face of a loss as any side to tour Australia in the recent past.

India made excuses for their performance until there was nothing left to complain about. New Zealand challenged but fell well short last year. And the West Indies failed to compete.

Only the South Africans have been able to leave Australia in a state of flux on home soil.

Where Pakistan ranks among these most recent visitors is difficult to tell because it was a series filled with so many contrasting emotions and performances.

One day people were questioning whether they had sent their A team. The next they looked more skillful and proficient than the Harlem Globetrotters.

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